Welcome to the YoungWilliams Research & Case Law Library.  Use the filters below to select categories of interest to you.  Currently our Library consists of academic and government research articles and reports from around the country, federal opinions, and case law from states in which our full service child support projects are located: Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming.  Sign up to receive updates by clicking the blue  box at the left of the page.

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Research & Case Law

Truth and Consequences: Part II. Questioning the Paternity of Marital Children

September 2003

There is wide variation among the states on the issue of paternity disestablishment for marital children. While some states have enacted legislation, few have adopted a comprehensive scheme that deals with potential challenges by husbands, wives, and paramours. This is a link to a monograph that discusses the need for states to have a comprehensive scheme for addressing the concerns of all potential parties, and that disestablishment actions must consider the best interests of the child, and protect these interests through appointment of a guardian ad litem.

State of Washington Joint Agency Collection Project

September 2003

This report summarizes the results of a federal grant to study ways to assist incarcerated and recently released non-custodial parents (NCP). Three agencies collaborated: the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Child Support, the Employment Security Department, and the Department of Corrections, all of which share a common interest in the success of this population.

Truth and Consequences Part III: Who Pays When Paternity is Disestablished?

September 2003

This is a link to the last in a series of three monographs about paternity disestablishment. This monograph discusses the fiscal consequences to the child, the parents, and the state if paternity is disestablished.

Durham v. Durham (Wyoming 2003)

August 2003

Deviation is allowed for substantial cost of transportation and visitation.

In re Marriage of Metz (Kansas 2003)

June 2003

Whether the district court has the authority under Uniform Interstate Family Support Act to modify its child support order involves whether it has subject matter jurisdiction, which is a question of law over which an appellate court has unlimited review.

In re Marriage of Metz (Kansas 2003)

June 2003

Whether the district court has the authority under Uniform Interstate Family Support Act to modify its child support order involves whether it has subject matter jurisdiction, which is a question of law over which an appellate court has unlimited review.

Determining the Composition and Collectibility of Child Support Arrearages: Volume II –the Case Assessment

June 2003

The second of two reports, this Report examines the history of the non-custodial parent's (NCP) involvement with the child support program, and reviewed orders calculated using the Washington State child support guidelines, the quality of work performed by the field staff, payment and debt records, and identified NCP barriers to payment.

Child Support Cost Avoidance in 1999: Final Report

June 2003

This report updates and expands upon the earlier microsimulation approach used by Wheaton and Sorensen (1998).

Determining the Composition and Collectibility of Child Support Arrearages: Volume I – the Longitudinal Analysis

May 2003

The first of two reports, this Report examines the composition of arrearages and summarizes the findings of the study regarding the correlation between a non-custodial parent's (NCP) earnings level and the NCP’s accumulated arrearages.

Examining Child Support Arrears in California: The Collectibility Study

March 2003

This report was prepared in response to a mandate from the California State Legislature to analyze how much of the $14.4 billion in child support arrears owed statewide in March 2000 was realistically collectible.

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