Welcome to the YoungWilliams Research & Case Law Library.  Use the filters below to select categories of interest to you.  Currently our Library consists of academic and government research articles and reports from around the country, federal opinions, and case law from states in which our full service child support projects are located: Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming.  Sign up to receive updates by clicking the blue  box at the left of the page.

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Research & Case Law

Rupp v. Grubb (Kansas 1998)

July 1998

Where a parent is incarcerated in a correctional facility, the fact of incarceration, standing alone, is not legal justification for the suspension or modification of the parent's child support obligation previously determined under the Kansas Child Support Guidelines.

Rupp v. Grubb (Kansas 1998)

July 1998

Where a parent is incarcerated in a correctional facility, the fact of incarceration, standing alone, is not legal justification for the suspension or modification of the parent's child support obligation previously determined under the Kansas Child Support Guidelines.

State ex rel. Secretary of SRS v. Miller (Kansas 1998)

February 1998

When a child is born out of wedlock and no credible evidence exists that the child has a presumed father, the trial court may order genetic testing in a paternity action without first conducting a best interest hearing (Ross hearing), which is to determine whether the testing would be in the best interests of the child.

State ex rel. Secretary of SRS v. Miller (Kansas 1998)

February 1998

When a child is born out of wedlock and no credible evidence exists that the child has a presumed father, the trial court may order genetic testing in a paternity action without first conducting a best interest hearing (Ross hearing), which is to determine whether the testing would be in the best interests of the child.

State ex rel. Secretary of SRS v. Miller (Kansas 1998)

February 1998

When a child is born out of wedlock and no credible evidence exists that the child has a presumed father, the trial court may order genetic testing in a paternity action without first conducting a best interest hearing (Ross hearing), which is to determine whether the testing would be in the best interests of the child.

State v. Batt and Filbert (Nebraska 1998)

January 1998

Even when a child has a presumptive father, a later action to determine paternity is not barred although clear and convincing evidence is necessary to rebut presumption.

In re Marriage of Scott (Kansas 1998)

January 1998

Income withholding for purposes of enforcement of child support obligations is provided by Kansas statute.

Prochaska v. Prochaska (Nebraska 2009)

January 1998

When setting a child support obligation for an obligor with multiple families, the court may deviate from a strict application of the guidelines as long as it considers the facts of the case.

In re Marriage of Johnson (Kansas 1997)

December 1997

If a reasonable person could conclude that a parent is not deliberately unemployed or underemployed, it is not an abuse of discretion for the district court to refuse to impute the parent's former income in calculating the child support obligation.

In re Marriage of Johnson (Kansas 1997)

December 1997

Under the Kansas Child Support Guidelines, income may be imputed to the non-custodial parent if that parent is deliberately unemployed or underemployed.

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